The First Annual Driver Scorecard® Benchmarking Survey in Partnership with Automotive Fleet

ARI’s driver safety program, ARI Driver Excellence®, uses telematics data through connected vehicle technology for real-time data collection of driver behavior.

In the first-of-its-kind survey, ARI partnered with Automotive Fleet to aggregate this driver behavior data to be used as an industry benchmark to assess driver behavior behind the wheel of all types of company vehicles. In next year’s annual survey, Automotive Fleet will track the evolution of these driver behaviors to identify industry best practices.

“In terms of best practices, there are several things every fleet manager should consider implementing, regardless of the immediate challenge they may be facing. From excessive idling, to speeding or harsh braking, preventive maintenance and fuel consumption, there are five universal practices and procedures that can help every fleet improve safety while also increasing efficiency and lowering costs,” said Rich Radi, director, Driver Excellence for ARI.

Below are the five universal best practices and procedures recommended by Radi:

  • Engagement. All stakeholders — from senior leadership to local supervisors — should be engaged in the process of managing driver behavior. To ensure success, senior leadership must support the initiative and communicate that support to everyone within the organization.
  • Policy. It’s absolutely critical that an organization has a well-communicated policy in place that defines acceptable driving practices as well as standard driving performance expectations, and that drivers fully comprehend the organization’s policies.
  • Training. New hires should receive onboarding assessments and training. Existing drivers should receive regular driver training to keep safety fresh in their minds. Violators should receive remedial training to help them improve deficient skills.
  • Measurement and Scoring. Organizations need to measure driving behavior through regular MVR checks and real-time evaluation of the data provided by telematics. Drivers should be scored for their driving performance based on comprehensive data sources. Whenever a driver exceeds the organization’s threshold for a given data parameter, the driver should be assigned points. Points should be tracked, aggregated, and categorized in order to identify high-risk drivers, as well as consistently safe drivers.
  • Immediate Management Action. When an event occurs — whether it is an accident, an infraction, a violation, or exceeding a set organization threshold — it is critical that action be taken immediately to improve the driver’s behavior. The action may include driver training, supervisor coaching, or ride-along observations, but it needs to be immediate in order to reinforce safe driving expectations.

To read the full article and see the survey results, click here.

“In terms of best practices, there are several things every fleet manager should consider implementing, regardless of the immediate challenge they may be facing. From excessive idling, to speeding or harsh braking, preventive maintenance and fuel consumption, there are five universal practices and procedures that can help every fleet improve safety while also increasing efficiency and lowering costs,” said Rich Radi, director, Driver Excellence for ARI.

Below are the five universal best practices and procedures recommended by Radi:

  • Engagement. All stakeholders — from senior leadership to local supervisors — should be engaged in the process of managing driver behavior. To ensure success, senior leadership must support the initiative and communicate that support to everyone within the organization.
  • Policy. It’s absolutely critical that an organization has a well-communicated policy in place that defines acceptable driving practices as well as standard driving performance expectations, and that drivers fully comprehend the organization’s policies.
  • Training. New hires should receive onboarding assessments and training. Existing drivers should receive regular driver training to keep safety fresh in their minds. Violators should receive remedial training to help them improve deficient skills.
  • Measurement and Scoring. Organizations need to measure driving behavior through regular MVR checks and real-time evaluation of the data provided by telematics. Drivers should be scored for their driving performance based on comprehensive data sources. Whenever a driver exceeds the organization’s threshold for a given data parameter, the driver should be assigned points. Points should be tracked, aggregated, and categorized in order to identify high-risk drivers, as well as consistently safe drivers.
  • Immediate Management Action. When an event occurs — whether it is an accident, an infraction, a violation, or exceeding a set organization threshold — it is critical that action be taken immediately to improve the driver’s behavior. The action may include driver training, supervisor coaching, or ride-along observations, but it needs to be immediate in order to reinforce safe driving expectations.

To read the full article and see the survey results, click here.

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